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Tuesday, October 27, 2020

Daddy Long Legs - Lowdown Ways Deluxe Edition


It's almost a year and a half since New York blues bashers DADDY LONG LEGS released their Jimmy Sutton-produced album Lowdown Ways. To commemorate the anniversary of their Yep Roc debut, the band  released the digital only deluxe edition of the album with three unreleased tracks from the Lowdown Ways sessions. This was the perfect opportunity for this blog to talk to singer, songwriter, harmonica player and guitarist  Brian Hurd

 1) For the viewers of this blog who would not know you, What would you tell about Daddy Long Legs to introduce yourselves? How long are you together as a band?  What is your musical background? Who is playing what instrument in the band nowadays?

Hmmm well that’s a tall order let me see see here.... We’re a New York City based Trio playing our own supercharged style of Rhythm & Blues. We’ve been at it a decade now touring the world, releasing records and leaving a trail of utter devastation in our wake. We were formed over a mutual love of razor sharp blues heroes and It’s been the same original lineup since the beginning. Josh Styles on Drums and Percussion, Murat Aktürk on Guitar and myself on Blues Harp, Guitar and Lead Vocals.  


2) About the latest full length record "Lowdown Ways",  what can you tell about the recording process? Was this a "live" in the studio recording or a track by track recording with lots of overdubs? 

Lowdown Ways was recorded in Chicago at Hi-Style Studios and  was produced by Jimmy Sutton and engineered by Alex Hall. All the basic tracks were done live. We don’t do a lot of overdubs! 

3) Do you use the nowadays recording technology or do you guys only work with analog machines in analog studios?

Mostly analog but we use some modern equipment to try to get the best of both worlds. 

4) Is there a main composer in the band or is everybody involved in one way or another?

I would say I’ve been the main composer but everyone brings their own thing to it and all the new songs we’ve been writing this year have been very much a group effort. 

5) What is your favorite topic/topic that comes easily when you write a new song?

Personal experience. 

6) How would you describe the kind of music you guys are playing? If I were to call it "Roots rock'n'roll", would you agree with this description or do you consider there is way more than that? 

We call it Rock N Roll salvation through the spirit of Roots N Blues! 

7) Do you have a new video on youtube featuring a track from the LP?

We have the “Pink Lemonade” music video and also the official album trailer that feature two singles from “Lowdown Ways”. 


8) To what kind of music did you listen to as teenagers? What were your favorite bands as a teenager? Name 3 bands that you consider still have an influence on your own work today.

We were all raised on Punk Rock. The Ramones, The MC5 and The Stooges have been a big influence. Our music is a lot different sonically speaking but the spirit and the attitude is there. 

9) What can concert goers expect at a Daddy Long Legs gig? Are you playing any famous cover
songs during the set? 

Most people have described our shows as being a spiritual experience. Our gigs are hot and sweaty with a lot of foot stomping and hand clapping. We don’t do a lot of covers but when we do we tend to go for something a bit more obscure. 

10) Are there any bands in the USA today you consider yourself close to, musically speaking?

Were sort of in a class of our own.  Even amongst the so called “roots rock” or “punk blues” type bands but there’s a lot of great bands out there we dig a whole bunch such as Bloodshot Bill, Harlem Slim, Blind Boy Paxton, Nikki Hill, Blackfoot Gypsies, The Nude Party & JD McPherson. 

11) What are the plans for the rest of 2020 as far as Daddy Long Legs is concerned?

We’ve been focusing on writing new music and we’re now closing in on another albums worth of material. Stay tuned! 

12) Anything you wanna add?

Daddy Long Legs is The Truth!




Friday, October 16, 2020

JENNY EP on WANDA Records


Justin Maurer and some of his friends released this debut EP under the moniker JENNY as a single sided colored 12" vinyl. The flipside has been decorated with a silkscreen print.

Read this very interesting interview where Justin reveals, amongst other things, the origin of the band's name, how the songs were recorded, how a good power pop song should sound and how music as a form of communication provides him with a catharsis.


 1) For the viewers of this blog who would not know you, What would you tell about JENNY to introduce yourselves? How long are you guys together as a band? Who is playing what instrument in the band nowadays? Can you explain the choice of the band's name.

My name is Justin Maurer and since I was 15 years old I've toured and released records with bands like Maurice's Little Bastards, Deadly Weapons, Red Dons, Clorox Girls, Suspect Parts, Mano De Mono, LA Drugz, and Maniac.  When I was playing guitar and singing in Maniac I wrote some songs that were in more of a 60s power-pop vibe that didn't really fit in with what Maniac was doing.  James "Jimmy" Carman (who played drums in LA Drugz and Maniac) and I recorded some songs in his home studio in Carson, California that I dubbed "Carson Drift Studios".  The recordings turned out pretty damn good. We play well and sing well together.  I played guitar and bass and sang lead vocals. Jimmy played drums and sang backing vocals.  We had a lot of great harmonies. 

My little brother moved to Texas, and I drove out there from Los Angeles to visit last year for Christmas.  L.A. to Dallas, Texas is about a 24 hour drive. On the way, my good friend Cezar Mora and I did a mini-tour playing country music covers and originals. This project is called Cezar & Justin.  The last show of our mini-tour was in Tucson, Arizona.  We stayed with Matt Rendon from the killer band, The Resonars. He showed us his analog home studio called Midtown Island Studios which he has in a shed in his backyard.  The studio was incredible. All of the Resonars records he made there sounded fucking fantastic. I began jonesing to record there.  On the long drive back from Texas after Christmas, I made a pit stop in Tucson and recorded some songs with Matty.  I sang and played guitar and Matt played drums, bass, lead guitar, and sang backing vocals.  The Carson Drift and Midtown Island recordings became the JENNY EP.   When I was thinking about what to call this project my good friend Jenny Messer (who frequently roadies for The Spits and the King Khan & BBQ Show)  said that the best name in the world for a band would be JENNY.  I thought about it and agreed with her.  Jenny Angellio from the band Neighborhood Brats thinks the band is named after her.  Matt Rendon thinks I named the band after a girl named Jenny from Tucson.  My sister's name is Jenny. And I do love the Tommy Tutone song.  But the name actually comes from Jenny Messer's suggestion. Thanks Jenny.  After the pandemic dies down (we're still at around 1000 new cases of Covid daily in Los Angeles), I plan to form a full band and do some more recording and touring as JENNY.

2) About the HALF length record (as opposed to FULL length, ha ha), what can you tell about the recording process? Was this a "live" in the studio recording or a track by track recording with lots of overdubs? And why only 5 songs? What happened to the 5 other ones?

The recording was live, with guitar/vocals/and drums recorded at the same time.  If I didn't like the vocal take, I'd do it again, but some of the first takes ended up working out great.  We overdubbed bass. lead guitar, backing vocals and sometimes extra percussion and handclaps.  I have lots more songs, but I had the idea to make a one-sided 12" record that could play on 45 RPM speed.  I love 12" records on 45 speed. I believe one side of a 12" has to be 15 minutes or under to play on 45 RPM, so that's why you only have 5 songs.  I'm looking forward to recording a full length as soon as we can.

3) Do you use the nowadays digital recording technology or do you guys only work with analog machines in analog studios?

I always prefer analog studios and have done most of my records at fantastic analog studios like Egg Studios in Seattle, Stationhouse in Los Angeles, Smail Shock's Studio B in Berlin, Estudios Tigruss in Gandia, Spain and most recently Midtown Island Studio in Tucson, Arizona.   James Carman's home studio in Carson, California was digital, that's where we did the first 3 songs of the JENNY EP.  And the last 2 songs are analog, at Matt Rendon's Midtown Island.   Where analog tape recordings are most noticeably "warmer" for me are in the drums and the vocals.  However, some digital recordings can sound pretty good too, it just depends on the recording technique, the microphones used, the placement of the mics, and the equipment.   It's an analog guitar played through an analog amp, recorded with an analog mic that goes into a digital recording setup.  The first 3 songs on the EP which are digital sound pretty fucking great.  And of course the last 2 on analog sound great too.   I'm a purist and always prefer analog, but sometimes it can be cost-prohibitive and it can be much cheaper to do digital.  That said, if bands want an authentic old school sound, go with an analog engineer and an analog setup.

4) How come that Helen Santiago in on the BACK cover? Commercially speaking would it not have been a smarter move to put her on the FRONT? I mean no disrespect, but it is a general admitted fact that a girl on the front cover of a record is always good for the sales of a record.

The cover is a two sided one.  There is no back cover. It's a double A Side.  The Helen Santiago photo is a great shot by Vicky Vicks, a photographer from Madrid, that's why we used it.  I wanted people to think that Helen was "JENNY" and the other guys on the other side are the backing band.  It seems to have worked to some degree.

5) You are the composer of all the tunes on this record. What is your favorite topic/topic that comes easily when you write a new song?

Most of my songs are personal.  The first song "Stupid Band" is about playing in touring punk bands for 20 years, the second song "Rose City" is how heartbreaking it was to move away from Portland, Oregon and how I still miss my friends dearly.  The third tune "Cockroach Tea" is about moving into my new apartment in Pico Union, Los Angeles about four years ago and drinking a cup of tea. I set the mug down and saw a cockroach crawl out of it. "Don't mind me I'm just sitting here drinking cockroach tea".  "Alright WIth Me" is about the end of my last relationship. We got divorced. "Song For Sadie" is about my ex-girlfriend Sadie. Nearly every song on the three Clorox Girls LPs is about her.  She had a tragic event in her life, and when she told me, it broke my heart and I wrote the song for her. 

6) To what kind of music did you listen to as teenagers and does it still influence your today work? What were your favorite bands as a teenager? Name 3 bands that you consider still have a influence on your own work today.  

When I was a teenager and got into music, I was living in a small town near Seattle called Bainbridge Island. The local punk scene was very healthy at that point and some of the first records I owned were by local bands like PUD, The Rickets and The Displacements as well as a bunch of Seattle punk and 70's and 80's Californian punk.  My dad had a surfer friend from Morro Bay, California named Fran. He would mail me tapes of his local blues radio show.  Bluesmen like Lightnin' Hopkins, Howlin' Wolf, and Muddy Waters were on there as well as old country music like Lefty Frizell and Hank Williams.  One of my favorite movies as a teenager was "La Bamba",the biopic about 50s rock legend Ritchie Valens.  I also had lots of respect for early rock n roll like Little Richard, Buddy Holly and the Crickets, and James Brown.  I moved to the Pacific Northwest in 1994 and still remember the songs which were played on the local alternative radio station 107.7 The End.  Weezer's Blue Album, Nirvana's Unplugged in New York, the first Foo Fighters album with the ray gun on the cover.  My favorite band as a teenager was probably The Germs.  I have a Germs tattoo and still love the Germs.  I also have a Richie Valens tattoo.  So there's 2 that still have an influence on me today: The Germs and Ritchie Valens.  One more?  Buddy Holly.

7) Do you have a new video on youtube featuring a track from the LP? 

No, not yet.  I'm still bugging Andrew "Le Capitan" Zappin to make one for us.

8) What can concert goers expect at a JENNY concert? Are you playing any famous cover songs during the gig? 

Hopefully in 2021 we can tour again, right? I believe Americans are currently banned from entering Europe due to our government's complete and utter failure to contain the Coronavirus.  Famous cover songs?  We'll see...  it wouldn't be a surprise if I told you in this interview.

9) Are there any bands in The USA today you consider yourself close to, musically speaking?

I like the Reflectors outta Long Beach, California.  I also dig More Kicks out of London, England. I haven't heard any other bands that sound anything like us except my old bands Suspect Parts or LA Drugz maybe.

10) How would You describe the music you're playing? 

Power Pop/Punk with a strong 60s influence.  Catchy, warm, nice harmonies.  Many power pop bands really lack on the POWER end of things. (I can only agree with that! Eric) It's an art to balance both the pop and the power. It's something I always strive for. You gotta sweeten em up then kick em in the balls.

11) What are the plans for the rest of 2020 and for 2021 as far as JENNY is concerned? 

I'd like to record a full length record then tour in 2021 as soon as we can. Releasing another record, touring the west coast of the US and Europe would be fantastic.

12) Are you willing to talk about your youth as a CODA or do you believe this as no concern at all with JENNY? 

Sure.  I'm a CODA which means child of a deaf adult.  My mom, aunt, and stepdad are all Deaf. My first language was American Sign Language. When I grew up, I was the oldest in my family so I was the one that my mom relied on to interpret for her for most of my childhood and teenage years. My parents were divorced when I was really young. In my family we had a lot of alcohol and drug abuse on both sides as well as some history of sexual abuse. For me, music was an outlet that kept me sane.  A lot of my friends and family members got hit with drug and alcohol addiction, and I'm fortunate that music kept me motivated and out of that kind of trouble. I saw music as an escape out of a small town and began recording and touring when I was 15 years old. I love performing and playing music, and am very grateful to have had the opportunity to play all over North and South America and Europe with my bands.  Sign Language is a different form of communication that's visual.  Music is also a form of communication. When I'm communicating well in any language it provides me with a catharsis, a release, that has really helped me out in life, and I think it has helped many other people too. Great songwriting is great storytelling and I try to tell a story with my songs.


13) Anything you wanna add?

Thanks for listening!  The JENNY 12" is available in Europe through Wanda Records and in the US through Dirt Cult Records in Portland, Oregon. We're available for private events, weddings and bar mitzvahs. If there's any European festivals in 2021, JENNY would love to play!  By the way, for you German record collectors, the first pressing of the JENNY 12" is 300 copies, on blue vinyl, with a beautiful screenprint on the B side of the vinyl.  There's full color art, a great thick sleeve, and a download code of the album included. We're really happy with how it turned out, Monster at Wanda Records did an amazing job!  

Order the JENNY EP in Europe here: https://mailorder.wandarecords.de/

Order the JENNY EP in North America here:  https://dirt-cult-records.myshopify.com/products/jenny-s-t-12

Stream the JENNY EP here: https://jenny2020.bandcamp.com/album/jenny    

See Justin's music, writing, and ASL Interpreting here:  www.justin-maurer.com




 

Friday, October 9, 2020

Paul Collins' Beat - Another World Best of The Archives

Alive Naturalsound Records has recently released PAUL COLLINS' BEAT - Another World / The Best Of The Archives.

It took 2 years to Paul Collins to transcribe to his hard drive 40 years of music that was recorded on his countless cassettes. So, culled from his personal archives “Another World - The Best Of The Archives” compiles previously unreleased material going back to 1978 and the early days of the Paul Collins’ Beat. None of the recordings have been released before and all have been carefully remastered. 

This release comes with extensive liner notes by the man himself explaining in detail every song and sometimes bringing back memories of music made with his friend Steven Huff.

 Thanks to Patrick Boissel this blog had the opportunity to do this interview.

1)For the sake of the argument, let's say that a very young viewer stumbles upon this blog for the first time and doesn't know who Paul COLLINS is: what would you tell him about you and your background to introduce yourself and your body of work?

I'm a self taught musician who got his start back in 1974 making music that was not fashionable at all. Because of this we tenaciously stuck to our ideals and became pioneers in the type of music we are known for, punk / power pop.

2)At the end of the 70's /early 80's The BEAT was regarded as the next big thing in Powerpop: arecord deal with Columbia, an album produced by Bruce Botnick filled to rafters with amazingly catchy songs but it seems, in retrospect, that The KNACK got away with the one iconic hit the main public seems to remember from that area ("My Sharona") . How can this be explained and how do you feel about that? Are you bitter about this or not at all?

We weren't really regarded as the next big thing, even though we had one of the biggest managers and record companies in the business,  no one really knew what to do with us or how to market us, so consequently we fell through the cracks. For many years I consumed myself with trying to make it big in the music business, it was very frustrating and in the end pointless. When I concentrated on what I could do, tour and make records, my life became more enjoyable. 

3)Do you think it was easier to be a rock'n'roller way back in the 70's than it is now? Are there any excesses you would not indulge in today? 

I think being good and successful have always been difficult. I would have quit smoking sooner and taken better care of my teeth! 



4) When reading the liner notes of "Another world", it seems that you have in stock way more songs than the ones released on this album. Will you consider giving them away as a download on Bandcamp?  

No, I am very happy with the new record,  it has the good stuff on it, it's what I want people to hear. 

) What is your favorite topic/topic that comes easily when you write a new song?

There is none, writing a good song for me is totally unpredictable,  I never know what is going to pop up!

6) To what kind of music did you listen to as a teenager and does it still influence your today work? What were your favorite bands as a teenager? Name 3 bands that you consider still have a influence on your own work today.

I listened to a lot of AM radio, which was a little bit of everything that was popular,  it gave me a great foundation in music. I loved the bands from the 60's, The Beatles,  The Stones, most of the British Invasion bands, The Beach Boys, The Buckinghams, it was a golden age for rock n roll.My all time favorite band is The Beatles,  no doubt about it! Then I love most of the obvious singers and bands, Stones, Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel,  Jefferson Airplane,  Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley..

7) Are there any artists in The USA today you consider yourself close to, musically speaking?

Not sure, I am not listening to enough these days. 

8) As far as your new recordings are concerned, do you use the nowadays digital recording technology or do you still keep on working with analog machines in analog studios?

I work with whatever is available.  It's the music that I am mainly concerned with. 


and now a few questions from the viewers of the blog:

9) Alain from France tells us that At the time, he had glued the entire cover of the record (30 cm...)on the rear window of his car !! His question is : Why a slow song (You and I) on your first LP ?? Wonderful album ! How did you choose Bruce Botnick to produce it - good choice ? 

A good ballad is so important to a record, it's also the hardest kind of song to write.  I think it's an important part of the record.  Bruce was the absolute best producer The Beat could have ever hoped for, he loved the band, he got us signed along with Eddie Money to Columbia, so there was never any question that he would be our producer. 

10) An unknown Spanish speaking viewer wrote : 1-tienes previsto reeditar el disco ONE NIGHT? Mi vinilo no aguanta mas.esta hecho polvo.2-Encontre en una tienda de segunda mano,el cd Paul collins de JULIO'S RECORDS.Podrías contar algo sobre la gestación y producción del mismo.gracias.KEEP ON ROCKIN'.UN ABRAZO.

Hola, One Night es re edited y tu puedes comprarlo en mi Bandcamp pagina. Todos los musicos nesecito una bootleg discovered esto es mio! No es mi disco favorito, pero hay algunos Buenos temas. 

11) Curty Ray from the USA would like to know what it was like to work with Prairie Prince from the Tubes?

Prairie is amazing, awesome, fantastic drummer and super cool guy. He was our first pick to work with in San Francisco and fortunately for us he was available. He has the best drumming skills!

12) Jobe tells us that One of his favorite all time song is "That's What Life Is All About" so thank you for that. His question is "From going to Columbia then to Passport now on Alive did you have to cater your style to what the labels ask of you?"

No, not really. Columbia wanted hits and the rest of the labels loved us for what we did. At this point I have been with Alive Naturalsound Records the longest, it is a very comfortable and mutually beneficial arrangement. The fact that Alive is the sister company of Bomp! Records makes it even more perfect! 

PURCHASE IT HERE : https://www.bompstore.com/collins-paul-nerves-the-beat-another-world-best-of-the-archives-blue-vinyl-with-insert/







Friday, October 2, 2020

The Fox Sisters - Bust Out!

 

The Fox Sisters is featuring a group of friends, all veterans of the Rochester NY music scene who got together for kicks and immediately sparks flew! Before long they were known as the Flower City’s premier party starters and the go to band for night clubs, dances and backyard BBQ’s.

The Fox Sisters return this year with a new full-length album, "Bust Out!". Twelve original tracks recorded at the Subterranean Studios. First single served up is "The Song I Sing", with video directed by Austin Lake.

1) For the viewers of this blog who would not know you, What would you tell about The Fox Sisters to introduce yourselves? How long are you guys together as a band? Who is playing what instrument in the band nowadays?

The Fox Sisters are a six piece Rock’n’Roll band heavily influenced by American rhythm & blues music of the 1960’s. We are from Rochester, New York (USA) and have been a band since 2012, so about 8 years at this point. Band members are Patrick McNally vocals, Jimmy Filingeri bass, Brian Shafer drums, Mark Bradley sax, Phil Marshall guitar and Joe Bushen piano. This is Jimmy answering the questions by the way.

2) About the latest full length record "Bust Out", what can you tell about the recording process? Was this a "live" in the studio recording or a track by track recording with lots of overdubs?

Bust Out was recorded almost entirely live with only a few overdubs of backing vocals. We recorded in the Subterranean Studio which is the basement studio of Chris “The Squire” Zajkowski. Chris recorded, produced, engineered and mixed the entire album. We consider him our 7th sister. Chris has been creating pop masterpieces under the name The Squires of the Subterranean for decades and you should definitely check out his records.


3) Do you use the nowadays digital recording technology or do you guys only work with analog machines in analog studios? 

Bust Out was recorded and mixed on analog tape. We have recorded by both digital and analog means in the past, it usually depends on who we are working with and the type of equipment they have. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages. Honestly, we care more about WHO we are working with than how they are recording us. When I hear music I’ve made in the past the dynamic that is most apparent to me is people that were involved.

4) Is there a main composer in the band or is everybody involved in one way or another? 

Patrick writes most of the songs and I write some songs as well. That said, all of the songs are full band collaborations. The songs are skeletons when they are introduced but it’s not until the band adds their blood, guts and muscle that they are show ready.


5) What is your favorite topic/topic that comes easily when you write a new song?

Love, love, love and loving life. The flip side of those topics are abundant in the daily grind, who needs to hear any more about that? The Fox Sisters are here to spread love and happiness. Not in a hippy way. In a loud, dance ’til you drop and smile until your face hurts way.

6) To what kind of music did you listen to as teenagers and does it still influence your today work? What were your 3 favorite bands as a teenager?  

As a teen probably The Rolling Stones, The Replacements & Cheap Trick. The Rolling Stones are definitely a life long influence. With the Fox Sisters, the way the Stones took their influences and made it into something of their own is most significant. I also think our sax player Mark has a style similar to the Stones long time sax man Bobby Keys. In other words, a very Rock’n’Roll sound the suits us well.

7) Do you have a new video on youtube featuring a track from the LP?  

We have a couple of videos from the new album. The video for “The Song I Sing” was done by Austin Lake who makes amazing music under the name Aweful Kanawful as well as with The Televisionaries (a band that includes his talented brothers Trevor & Brendan). Austin also makes his own music videos and is finishing up a feature length film that several of The Fox Sisters play characters in. 



There is a video for “RunRabbit Run” that Jimmy made and Patrick is working on a video for “If You Only Knew”.

8) What can concert goers expect at a Fox Sisters concert? Are you playing any famous cover songs during the gig? 

People can expect dancing, sweat, and revelry bordering on a rampage. We try to put on a high energy show and we like to leave the audience exhausted but wanting more. We don’t do many covers but one song we have done recently is “Right Hand Man” by Bobby Comstock (famous for his song “Let’s Stomp!”) Bobby grew up not far from Rochester in Ithaca NY. We also recorded a cover of the song “Sweet Mary” by Wadsworth Mansion that is available on our website and Spotify. “Sweet Mary” did go to number 2 on the charts in 1970 but is still a fairly obscure number to most people. It’s a real gem of a song and I think we did it justice.

9) Are there any bands in The USA today you consider yourself close to, musically speaking? 

I would say our most obvious contemporary influences are The Fleshtones and Barrence Whitfield and The Savages. World class! Really the best of the best. Patrick and I also received an invaluable education from a local band called The Essentials, later known as The Salamanders.  They showed us that hometown bands were capable of making amazing Rock’n’Roll. Greg and Todd of  The Essentials went on to become The Hi-Risers. Mark of The Essentials is now a Fox Sister and the Essentials drummer Chris is The Squire, who produced Bust Out! We also have a great Rock’n’Roll scene here in Rochester. We love to play with and are inspired by our friends The Televisionaries (Hi-Tide Recordings), Aweful Kanawful, Harmonica Lewinski, Dangerbyrd and many more.

10) How would You describe the music you're playing? 

In the simplest terms, it’s Rock’n’Roll music. We are inspired by black rhythm & blues and soul music of the 50’s and 60’s. We are influenced by high energy Rock’n’Roll bands, R&B inspired garage and frat bands and blue eyed soul primarily from the 60’s but right up to the modern day. We do not attempt to capture the look or even the sound of the era we take influence from. What we hope to achieve is the aesthetic and the energy of the music we love. Those are elements we can define ourselves as they don’t belong to any one era.

11) What are the plans for the rest of 2020 as far as Fox Sisters is concerned? 

We will continue to promote our album as best we can under the current circumstances.  We are still writing songs and rehearsing and hoping for a better 2021. Once the coast is clear we plan to play more shows in as many places as we can manage.  

12) Anything you wanna add? 

If you made it this far in the interview we hope you are interested enough to give our music a listen. If you like what you hear please tell your friends about The Fox Sisters. Our music is available on Bandcamp & Spotify. Our records are distributed by Get Hip in the US and FOLC Records in Europe. Thank you for your time!


Friday, September 25, 2020

SPIDERS -Killer Machine

A little while ago, during an interview I did with Zack from Blues Pills he mentioned SPIDERS as being one of the major bands in Sweden. So I immediately checked these guys out on the internet and I was amazed to discovered this 4 piece from Gothenburg. 


Their latest release, "Killer Machine", produced by Swedish legend Chips Kiesby, is filled to the rafters with catchy tunes and heavy riffs. Here is the interview of London born guitar player John Hoyles.

1) For the viewers of this blog who would not know you, What would you  tell about SPIDERS to introduce yourselves? How long are you guys  together as a band? Who is playing what instrument in the band  nowadays? 

John: We are a Swedish rock band based in Gothenburg and have been  around almost ten years. The group consists of Ann-Sofie Hoyles on  vocals, John Hoyles on guitar, Rickard Hellgren guitar, Olle Griphammar bass and  Ricard Harryson on drums. We have released three albums over the years  and done a bunch of tours  in Europe and the States.  

2) About the latest full length record "Killer Machine", what can you tell  about the recording process? Was this a "live" in the studio recording or  a track by track recording with lots of overdubs? 

We recorded the album in Gothenburg at the studio Music A Matic with  Chips Kiesby as producer. Hes a bit of a legend here in sweden and has  produced loads of bands like The Hellacopters and Graveyard so it was  really interesting and educational working with him. He had a lot of good  references when it came to guitar and drum sounds and understood what  we wanted to achieve. On Killer Machine we worked track by track and took  our time with overdubs on each song. On our previous albums we have  recorded live using analog tape machines with just a few overdubs so it was  cool trying something new.  

3) Do you use the nowadays digital recording technology or do you guys  only work with analog machines in analog studios? 

Both, our latest album was recorded digital but our other albums were  analog. I think computers are so good nowadays that one cant hear the  difference anymore but I prefer recording analog because you don't look at  a computer screen all the time and just uses ones ears.  

4) Is there a main composer in the band or is everybody involved in one  way or another? 

Previously I used to write most of the songs but now it's more of a joint  effort. Someone in the band comes up with a riff or idea for a song and then we jam on it in the rehearsal room until we find a structure for a song. We  usually record a pre production of the song so we can work out details and  stuff before going into the studio.  

5) What is your favorite topic/topic that comes easily when you write a new  song? 

I don't know. I like songs to be simple and I suppose most of our songs are  about love, being mistreated, doom and gloom and a little bit of politics. I  find it difficult to write lyrics so they don't sound stupid or pretentious.  

6) To what kind of music did you listen to as teenagers? What were your  favorite bands as a teenager? Name 3 bands that you consider still  have an influence on your own work today. 

I grew up listening to my parents records. A Lot of The Rolling Stones and  Bob Dylan. When I was 11 I was looking through an old photo album of my mum's and found some photos she had taken of the band Cream back in 1967 when they played in her hometown. They really blew me away, Eric Clapton's early stuff influenced me a lot.  When I became a teenager I started listening to Black Sabbath , Led Zeppelin and going to record fairs buying obscure records with 70's bands like Bang, Dust and Sir Lord Baltimore. Three bands that have  influenced us as a band could be Black Sabbath, Heart and The Runaways.  

7) Do you have a new video on youtube featuring a track from the LP?

Yes, we did a video for Dead Or Alive, you can find it on youtube.  We also have some other videos from our previous albums. 



8) What can concert goers expect at a SPIDERS gig? Are you playing any  famous cover songs during the gig? 

Our singer Ann-Sofie is a mix of Iggy pop and Mick Jagger on stage so its  always a good show to watch. We also have one of the best drummers around  and lots of guitar riffs and solos. So if your into hard rock I don't think you'll be  disappointed. 

9) Are there any bands in Sweden today you consider yourself close to  musically speaking? 

I think we are usually associated with bands like Graveyard, Blues Pills and Horisont. We have done a lot of tours together and are good friends. There is a big rock scene in Sweden with lots of good  bands like Lucifer, Dead Lord and Hot Breath to name a few.

10) How would You describe the music you're playing? Is this "vintage  rock'n'roll" or do you consider there is way more than that? 

That's a difficult question. I used to play in a band called Witchcraft that was quite heavy 70's rock sounding back around 2004. People at the time called our music doom rock and then we went to the US people called us hipster metal and then a few years after that  we were called retro rock. And now all the bands that played similar music was categorized as retro rock including us. I prefer just saying we play classic rock. 

11) What are the plans for the rest of 2020 as far as SPIDERS is concerned?  When can we expect a new SPIDERS full-length? 

We had a few tours booked in Germany and Spain that have been postponed to 2021 and we had some festival gigs that were cancelled. It's been tough for everybody this year and I hope the music venues are going to survive. There's going to be a lot of bands touring when this Corona situation passes. We have been recording demos of some new songs and I hope we have enough songs soon to record an album. 


12) A special question for you John: You were born in London, UK and Moved  to Sweden in your teens. Do you believe that the kind of music SPIDERS is  playing could much easier come to life in Sweden rather that in the UK where everything is either indie rock or dance music? 

Probably. I lived in a town called Örebro in the middle of Sweden and was fortunate to meet a lot of musicians that liked the same music. There was a a lot of tape trading among friends and an obsession of finding albums of old 70's bands that sounded like Black Sabbath. The US group Pentagram was really big in Örebro before many people had heard of them. There were many bands from Örebro that were inspired by 60's and 70's rock like Witchcraft, Norrsken, The Strollers,Dead Man, Great Mammoth, Troubled Horse, and Asteroid.  Music and style comes round in circles and I was lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time. 

13) Anything you wanna add?

Stay safe out there and I hope we can meet up and have a few beers at a rock n roll show soon

Purchase the previous releases HERE: https://www.facebook.com/wearespiders/shop/?ref_code=mini_shop_page_card_cta&ref_surface=page


Monday, September 21, 2020

The Fuzz​-​O​-​Phonic Sound of​.​.​. The Ev!l FUZZHEADS


THE EVIL FUZZHEADS are a wild fuzzy trio from Brussels featuring 2 members of the VICE BARONS: Guitar player Eric St JOHN and drummer Paul HAMESSE. The third member of the band is bass player Iris St JOHN, daughter of Eric.

Their splendid and very exciting debut full length album 'The Fuzz-O-Phonic Sound Of' is proudly released by German label SOUNDFLAT RECORDS

Expect some very powerful Hammond-driven fuzzy garage rock with a heavy influence of the 60's sounds and a hint of psychedelia.


The record is featuring twelve original tunes penned by Eric St JOHN that certainly won't disappoint you! Starting off with an absolute killer-song 'So Strange So Strange' that is extremely addictive and wild.

Further you'll be amazed by tracks like 'She's Wearing Rainbows In Her Hair' or 'Make Her Mine'. 

And finally you will also discover the slightly softer garage psych-tunes of the Ev!l FUZZHEADS in songs like 'You Creep Me Out' or 'My Hands Belong To The Devil'.

The perfect mix for any garage head who digs fuzzy, organ driven 60's garage-psych-rock!

WAY COOL SPLATTERED WAX, LIMITED TO 100 COPIES ONLY, JUST AVAILABLE FROM SOUNDFLAT MAILORDER !!!


Support the band by purchasing a digital copy here: 




Friday, September 4, 2020

Blues Pills - Holy Moly!




Originally planned for April 2020,  NUCLEAR BLAST Records finally released at the end of August, "Holy Moly!" the third and long-awaited studio album of the Sweden's rock sensation BLUES PILLS. 

This new full length is certainly the band's best record to this day, displaying a fantastic range of psychedelic tunes, soaring soundscapes, emotional hymns and Elin Larsson's powerful soul voice!

So it was time for this blog to talk to guitar player and founding member Zack Anderson.

1) For the viewers of this blog who would not know you, What would you tell about Blues Pills to introduce yourselves? How long are you guys together as a band?  There have been various changes in the band over the years. Who is playing what instrument in the band nowadays? 

We are a rock band with blues/soul/psychedelic influences.  Elin and myself formed the band in 2011, and there’s been various line up changes over the years.   Currently our lineup is: Elin Larsson - Vocals; Zack Anderson - Guitar; Andre Kvarnström - Drums; Kristoffer Schander - Bass

2) About the latest full length record "Holy Moly!", what can you tell about the recording process? Was this a "live" in the studio recording or a track by track recording with lots of overdubs? 


The recording process was somewhere in between.  It was important for us to get a live feeling, but since this was before Kristoffer joined the band it was just Me, Elin and Andre in the studio, so totally live wasn’t really possible. The three of us played together to track the drums and get as much live feeling as possible.  Then I would go back and add a bass, and more guitars.  And finally vocals.  The downside to recording this way is sometimes you don't know if you got it right until your at the end of adding everything, so some songs we would be done, then trash it all and start over up to 4-5 times.  Not because we felt it wasn't "perfect" technically, because we don't care so much about that, but if the feeling wasn't right or the emotion wasn't coming across right.


3) Do you use the nowadays digital recording technology or do you guys only work with analog machines in analog studios?

The first two albums we recorded and mixed totally analog.  The newest album  Holy Moly! was a hybrid because it was all analog on the front end during tracking, but then everything was put to the computer and the files sent to Andrew Scheps for mixing. There is a lot of analog and vintage equipment which I love and wouldn't want to record without, but for me the question about analog vs digital is more about workflow than the sound for me.   My main concern is getting the source right.  I used to be firmly in the analog camp because my first experiences with digital were not that great, but nowadays there is some really good sounding converters, and my opinion is it's a lot more important the choice of guitar, amp, microphone, high quality preamp, etc.  If you get all that right, and use nice converters, its going to sound great, and I would choose a high end digital setup vs, a shitty tape machine any day.  Don't get me wrong though, I still love to record on tape.  It can be a lot more fun and exciting to see the tape machine running vs, looking at a computer screen, and it forces you to make decisions in a different way which I like.  At the end of the day it's all just tools and great sounding albums have been made on both.

4) Is there a main composer in the band or is everybody involved in one way or another?


Elin and I formed the band, and have always been the main songwriters.  That said the others are definitely involved as well.  Usually it starts with me or Elin, having a general idea or some kind of outline for a song, then we show it to the others and finish as a group.  In some cases, like with the song Proud Woman, it was actually born from a jam.  We just started to play and stumbled upon it, it kind of just happened, so every song is different.

5) What is your favorite topic/topic that comes easily when you write a new song?

For me, I definitely get more inspired to write lyrics by negative emotions like sadness, anger, heartbreak, things like that.  I don't know, I am not a depressed person, but it just feels a lot easier for me to write songs when it gets triggered by those things.


6) To what kind of music did you listen to as teenagers and does it still influence your today work? What were your favorite bands as a teenager? Name 3 bands that you consider still have a influence on your own work today.

In my early teens I was interested in music I was sort of searching and listening to different styles of music to see what I liked.  The thing that changed it was when I was 14 I first heard Seven Nation Army by the White Stripes.  I had just started to play guitar and I learned that song, and pretty much from that moment I got hooked and wanted to be in a band.  At that point my music tastes started to shift towards more "vintage" styled music.  Soon I bought a Jimi Hendrix greatest hits CD, and I listened to that constantly.  By the time I was 17 I discovered Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac, and from there I just continued down this path of discovering more and more music from that era.  Even though it's old music, as a teenager in the early 2000's it felt like something totally new and fresh to me, because it was so different from what you heard on the radio.

7) Do you have a new video on youtube featuring a track from the LP? 

Right now there is three, Proud Woman, Low Road, and Rhythm in the Blood..  We also have plans to make at least one more.



8) What can concert goers expect at a Blues Pills? Are you playing any famous cover songs during the gig? 

The set is basically 98% our original songs, but we have sometimes done covers.  Some of them were more obscure unknown songs.  Although we did a cover of "Somebody to Love" by Jefferson Airplane...  The festival goers always liked it.

9) Are there any bands in Sweden today you consider yourself close to musically speaking?

There is quite a lot of bands playing music inspired by vintage rock, etc. in Sweden, so the list could go on forever.  But some of the more well known ones are Graveyard, Witchcraft, Spiders, Horisont, Troubled Horse...

10) How would You describe the music you're playing? Is this strictly blues, like the name of the band might suggest or do you consider there is way more than that?  

I think when some people think of the blues they think of more pure blues like BB King or something... and we are far away from that.  In comparison it's almost like hard rock, but for sure there's always this undertone of blues in our music.  When the band was formed we were so inspired by Peter Green and wanted to get a similar feeling into our music.  So our idea of blues when we named the band was more this progressive British blues, like Black Magic Woman, Green Manalishi, and Rattlesnake Shake type of songs.   I think of us more of a rock band in general as a base, but then pulling in other influences and adding them, like soul, psychedelic, blues, country... etc.

11) What are the plans for the rest of 2020 as far as Blues Pills is concerned?
We are just rehearsing and waiting to be able to tour and play live again.  It's about all we can do now in these corona times unfortunately.



Purchase the goodies HERE:
https://www.nuclearblast.de/fr/products/tontraeger/vinyl/lp/blues-pills-holy-moly-red-black-splatter-vinyl.html

Special Thanks to Markus.